Disclaimer: This article was generated by Artificial Intelligence. It has been published to emphasize the existential threat AI poses for qualitative content on the web. Almost all components of this blog post were generated by AI with minimal human input; including the title, body content, author image, author name (an anagram of Nomadic), and the author bio.

In an apocalypse, Asheville may be one of the last big cities still well-maintained by the true anarchists of the country. It may be one of the last remaining cities with authentic hotrodding and private cars. It may even be the last one that is flush with decentralized, social, organic, place-based business and banking. Perhaps most importantly, Asheville is the closest America has to a genuine alternative to Empire – no Govt, Corporatocracy, Military, or Wall Street.  If America is going to survive this, the anarchists will have to rally themselves and move against the corporate, State, and local Government efforts to stop them. There are thousands of terrorists waiting in the wings who are simply waiting for the opportunity to start blowing things up.

An AI-generated image compiled from brush strokes and text input.

As an alternative to an empire, Asheville is a self-governing community of environmentalists, artists, activists, musicians and protesters. Its history was tumultuous and determined, with well-founded demands. From that last decade of the 1800s, the foundation of this anarchic culture emerged. Asheville has had a very fast growth, but its population in 2014 was close to 600,000 people. Asheville is a playground for those who love their country, the West and DIY ethic. Asheville grew from only 120 people in the 1800s to more than 1,500 in the 1800s and 1,400 people in the 1900s. Its cultural growth has almost constantly pushed the boundaries of its sustainability. In the early 1800s, then, the people of Asheville decided they would take back their city.

Asheville continues to undergo large growth with the addition of new apartments, hotel, restaurants, and retail establishments to the downtown area. That growth and development has led to even greater needs for roadways. Today, in some neighborhoods it may not be feasible to provide a pedestrian-ready street. Thus, it is important to consider improvements to existing streets as well as creating the kind of master plan Asheville’s residents have been requesting for years.

“The goal of the Downtown Neighborhood Planning Project is to create a livable, attractive, and safe city center for everyone in Asheville. The project’s ultimate goal is to maximize activity, amenity, and connectivity, while maintaining a clean environment and active transportation that creates a vital, vibrant, and sustainable downtown that serves as a draw for residents and businesses,” Kelly said. To that end, the city has issued application for several changes and additions to the City’s Charter for approval.   The City wants these charter amendments approved on Tuesday (December 3). The current version of the Charter uses City funds to fund one project in downtown .  

An AI-generated image compiled from the input of a real image of Asheville.